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architectural practice.
Gordon Stobbs, Newark District Couñ cii Architect, 1980 (page 54).
And it remains highly successful, to a disinterested observer. There is always the danger that an historic building open to the public and used as offices can suffer damage from unconsidered alterations telephones, networked computers and security especially and from plain wear and tear. Keiham Hall is not free of this, but historic buildings are usually tougher than modern ones, and vigilance has kept it under control.
It lies midway between the two main centres in the district, and even after 15 years there are still complaints. They come equally from both sides, so we must have got it right.

Michael Hurst is with Newark and Sherwood
District Coundi.


Above left: A modest Georgian terrace (possibly an early conversion from a warehouse), used by the
Council as a ‘catalyst’ rehab scheme.
Left:
Now converted to council housing.
Superfidally a good piece of conservation rehab:
only a dose look at the details shows the onset of creeping erosion of character.
Cottages in Mill Lane, part of Trent Navigation.
Below left: Three views of the Unitarian Chapel, High Pavement, The Lace Market, Nottingham, now converted to The Lace Centre, comprising a permanent exhibition with film about the story of Nottingham lace, shops selling lace and gifts and a coffee and snack bar. The scheme preserves the wonderful Byrne-Jones stained glass window (bottom far left).
Below:
Two views of Patchings Farm, Calverton,
Notts. Derelict farm buildings converted to an Arts Centre, with a picture gallery, restaurant, craft shops and a museum of farming.
THE
MONTAGU REPORT
TEN YEARS ON
CONTEXT 26

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